With her bangles and her spangles and her stars

the making of "beauty and crime"

[…] “I met Philip Glass as I was walking
down the street,” she explains over the phone from, of course,
Manhattan. “I run into him fairly often. And he said, ‘How’s it going?’
I said that I was without a record deal, and he looked really happy and
said, ‘Congratulations. That means you can do what you really want and
finally have freedom.’

“I wasn’t clear how I felt about it at the time.
I wasn’t seeing it from that point of view. Two weeks after 9/11, I
found out my deal with A&M was up and asked them for another year
on the label, and they didn’t pick up the option, so I quietly went
away.”

But she began thinking about Glass’s reaction.
“I decided to hire an engineer to work with, Brit Myers, and we just
played music into the computer. I riffed around and made loops and
things, without lyrics. It was a new way for me to work, and part of
the sleekness of these songs may be that I was working on a computer,
which compresses everything and allows you to edit and alter your work
in really interesting ways. It becomes like a collage."
[…]

That's from Ted Drozdowski's "Village Folk" in The Phoenix

I’d try to tell you that the things we had were right

Roger Sanchez – Another chance


[…] DJ Times: In 2001, when you had a hit with “Another
Chance,” it was a sample-oriented track using an old Toto song.
What do you think about that approach now?
Sanchez: I think that as long as it's done with
respect and done creatively, [it's OK]. What's interesting is that,
on that song especially, I really loved the vocal hook, what it
said, and the melody behind it. But instead of taking that melody,
I took the vocal hook and I re-did a lot around it and played a
lot of the instruments. I changed it up quite a bit. When you sample,
you've got to do it creatively, otherwise it's just a loop and it
doesn't say very much. […]

I missed the song the first time 'round, but heard it on the radio (official/unofficial) the other morning while driving into work. Today I remembered it and found Emilly Tan's DJ Times article "The S-Man"

Letting your tape rock till your tape pop

Girl TalkGirl TalkGirl TalkGirl TalkGirl Talk
Girl TalkGirl TalkGirl TalkGirl TalkGirl Talk
Girl TalkIMG_9601.Girl TalkGirl TalkGirl TalkGirl Talk


"[…] As he clicked away Saturday night, wearing the cast-off clothes of
those in attendance, he frequently reached behind his back without
looking, grabbing the hands of audience members who were supposed to be
surrounding him onstage, clasping them in a strange display of ironic
solidarity or as a plea for performative assistance. I’m not sure
which, but probably a little bit of both."


Marathonpacks' Girl Talk review
(via kathryn yu) helps me understand what I saw at last November's Be the Riottt!