Songs I’m not listening to on the radio

If Everyone Cared

Music exists partly to challenge those authorities (i)

Sinead O'Connor Rivers of Babylon (live)
Sinead O'Connor - Fire On Babylon
Sinead O'Connor - Downpressor Man / None a Jah Jah Children
Sinead O'Connor - War

[…] In order to understand the
dynamics of reggae, however, a clear understanding of Rastafari must be
grasped. Reggae is an auditory representation of the experience of
Rastafari which is based on the mystical union of the human and the
divine. Rastafari, like many syncretized religions of the African
diaspora seeks a unity (
inity) of the personal, social, and intrapersonal aspects of being. This inity is expressed in the concept of InI,
which depending on the context, could refer to the individual, the
community, or divinity located in the personage of His Imperial
Majesty, Haile Selassie I, Jah Ras Tafari. Everything begins and ends
with
InI.
As Dawes explains, “Rastafarianism represents a fundamental break with
traditional and conventional Judaeo-Christianity. It redefines the
meaning of deity and recasts the figure of God in terms that are
antithetical to colonial representations of the Christian godhead. By
establishing a god in Haile Selassie, Rastafarianism breaks away from
the patterns of conventional Christianity that operate in Jamaica and
brings into being a new and very elaborate series of modern myths”
(98). Rastafari’s insistence on the validity of individual experience,
the indwelling god, “I,” whose union with the ever living God, “I”,
provided an
intellectual and experiential basis
to its claims. There was no difference between “I” and “I”. The
Cartesian mind/body split and the “I” and “Thou” of Buber were
obliterated. As Dawes further states, “This lends to reggae a defiant
but complex mythology and offers the reggae influenced artist an
approach to art that allows for a dialogue between the political and
the spiritual. Essentially, this quality in reggae defies much of the
binarism that characterises much of western discourse” (99). In other
words, the
legitimacy of a reggae influenced artist’s work would be based on her depiction of the experiences of the landscape, peoples, religions and cultures of the Caribbean or Plantation America […]

That's from Geoffrey Philp's "Reggae, Rastafari and Aesthetics" (via Planet Grenada) and it went well for me this evening with Spinner's "Sinead O'Connor Gives a Lesson in 'Theology'"

Popozuda and circumstance

“The reasons are purely aesthetic, not medical, especially for women. They want to get thin no matter what, all
because of images from north of the Equator. It is a cruel cultural
imposition on the Brazilian woman.”


Dr. Elisaldo de
Araújo Carlini, "a professor at the Federal University of São Paulo
."

“To be fat used to be considered wonderful in Brazil, because it
showed that you eat very well, which is important to Brazilians. That you have three meals a day and eat
meat and beans, calmly, at a table with friends and relatives, means
that someone is taking good care of you.”

Roberto da Matta, "an anthropologist and newspaper columnist who is a leading social commentator."


“Those huge breasts you see in the United States, like in Playboy, were
always considered ridiculous in Brazil. But there is now more of a
tendency than before to want breasts that are a bit larger — not to
make them huge, mind you, but more proportional as part of a body that
is more svelte and more athletic.”

<

p style=”text-align: right”>Ivo Pitanguy, "the
country’s most renowned plastic surgeon."

“This abrupt shift is a feminine
decision that reflects changing roles […] Men are still resisting and clearly
prefer the rounder, fleshier type. But women want to be free and
powerful, and one way to reject submission is to adopt these
international standards that have nothing to do with Brazilian society.”

Mary del Priore, "a historian and co-author of 'The History of Private Life in Brazil'"

Larry Rohter, New York Times, "In the Land of Bold Beauty, a Trusted Mirror Cracks"