King’s other dream

"[…] There is at the outset a very obvious and
almost facile connection between the war in Vietnam and the struggle I
and others have been waging in America. A few years ago there was a
shining moment in that struggle. It seemed as if there was a real
promise of hope for the poor, both black and white, through the poverty
program. There were experiments, hopes, new beginnings. Then came the
buildup in Vietnam, and I watched this program broken and eviscerated
as if it were some idle political plaything of a society gone mad on
war. And I knew that America would never invest the necessary funds or
energies in rehabilitation of its poor so long as adventures like
Vietnam continued to draw men and skills and money like some demonic,
destructive suction tube. So I was increasingly compelled to see the
war as an enemy of the poor and to attack it as such. […]"

"Beyond Vietnam: A Time to Break Silence" (background)

King’s other dream

"[…] There is at the outset a very obvious and
almost facile connection between the war in Vietnam and the struggle I
and others have been waging in America. A few years ago there was a
shining moment in that struggle. It seemed as if there was a real
promise of hope for the poor, both black and white, through the poverty
program. There were experiments, hopes, new beginnings. Then came the
buildup in Vietnam, and I watched this program broken and eviscerated
as if it were some idle political plaything of a society gone mad on
war. And I knew that America would never invest the necessary funds or
energies in rehabilitation of its poor so long as adventures like
Vietnam continued to draw men and skills and money like some demonic,
destructive suction tube. So I was increasingly compelled to see the
war as an enemy of the poor and to attack it as such. […]"

"Beyond Vietnam: A Time to Break Silence" (background)

Popozuda and circumstance

“The reasons are purely aesthetic, not medical, especially for women. They want to get thin no matter what, all
because of images from north of the Equator. It is a cruel cultural
imposition on the Brazilian woman.”


Dr. Elisaldo de
Araújo Carlini, "a professor at the Federal University of São Paulo
."

“To be fat used to be considered wonderful in Brazil, because it
showed that you eat very well, which is important to Brazilians. That you have three meals a day and eat
meat and beans, calmly, at a table with friends and relatives, means
that someone is taking good care of you.”

Roberto da Matta, "an anthropologist and newspaper columnist who is a leading social commentator."


“Those huge breasts you see in the United States, like in Playboy, were
always considered ridiculous in Brazil. But there is now more of a
tendency than before to want breasts that are a bit larger — not to
make them huge, mind you, but more proportional as part of a body that
is more svelte and more athletic.”

<

p style=”text-align: right”>Ivo Pitanguy, "the
country’s most renowned plastic surgeon."

“This abrupt shift is a feminine
decision that reflects changing roles […] Men are still resisting and clearly
prefer the rounder, fleshier type. But women want to be free and
powerful, and one way to reject submission is to adopt these
international standards that have nothing to do with Brazilian society.”

Mary del Priore, "a historian and co-author of 'The History of Private Life in Brazil'"

Larry Rohter, New York Times, "In the Land of Bold Beauty, a Trusted Mirror Cracks"