“Shape of Water” by Saint and Kings

The Shape of Water
Saint and Kings
Shape of Water
Saint and Kings

Lately it's been heavy
all my friends have been in trouble by the pound
And they're spread out
and there is only so much of me to go around

Asking how things are going to go is like asking, "What's the shape of water?"
The condition is not the process is not the outcome is not the aftermath

Lately it's been harder
to stay present and not drift too far out of reach
What keeps me focused
is knowing the moment has so much to teach

Asking how things are going to go is like asking, "What's the shape of water?"
The condition is not the process is not the outcome is not the aftermath

The shape of water depends on the shape of the container you carry it in
The shape of water depends on the shape of the container you carry it in
The shape of water depends on the shape of the container you carry it in
The shape of water depends on the shape of the container you carry it in

I Overshot You (demo)

I Overshot You
George Kelly
I believe in energy and mass and light and gravity
I believe in engines you can calibrate with instruments
I believe that we should have found a way to unite
A way to harness large forces to our tiny desires

I overshot you
I overshot you
I'm out of your orbit
I'm not better for it
I overshot you

I believe in politics (just enough so I don't get sick)
I believe in the better world despite what I been told
I believe everything possible will come to be in time
A day will return when I am yours and you are mine

I overshot you
I overshot you
I'm out of your orbit
I'm not better for it
I overshot you

This home I inhabit is just an unlikely hovel
Instead of my long-hoped-for science fiction novel

I believe in afterlife (others' memories no pearly gates)
I believe nighttime prayer cuts my long-distance rates
I believe that we should have found a way to unite
A day will return when I am yours and you are mine

I overshot you
I overshot you
I'm out of your orbit
I'm not better for it
I overshot you

Next come DJing, breakdancing, beatboxing, and emceeing

[…]
The
adviser said that he had heard from a source in Iran that the
Revolutionary Guards have been telling religious leaders that they can
stand up to an American attack. "The Guards are claiming that they can
infiltrate American security," the adviser said. "They are bragging
that they have spray-painted an American warship—to signal the
Americans that they can get close to them." (I was told by the former
senior intelligence official that there was an unexplained incident,
this spring, in which an American warship was spray-painted with a
bull's-eye while docked in Qatar, which may have been the source of the
boasts.) […]

"Shifting Targets," Seymour Hersh, The New Yorker, Oct. 8, 2007

Fires burn, heart beats strong, sing out loud the chain gang song.

Grace Jones – Slave to the Rhythm

Rhythm is both the song's manacle and its demonic charge.


It is the original breath. It is the whisper of unremitted demand.


I. Penman, "The Annihilation of Rhythm."

‘To give a feeling of connection and relevance’

Royal Festival Hall Gala Celebration 5

[…]
"Everything in life is about personal relationships – including the way
one feels about music. I want to create as many
opportunities for people to have that 'aha' moment – give people the
chance to really connect with the composers." […]

[…] "Musicians, like actors and writers, can be maddeningly inarticulate
about what they do – because they do it, not talk about it. Marin is that rare exception. She has such a lucid, human
understanding of music that she can explain something the way that
others might tell you about certain items on the wall of their living
room." […]

"Marin Alsop breaks the glass baton," Elaine F. Weiss, Christian Science Monitor, Sept. 26, 2007

The man who killed the delirious party of late Romanticism

Glenn Gould – Webern

[…] Gould' s thoughts on ‘ideal' music were most vividly expressed in a few
lines he wrote about Jan Sibelius in 1974: “at its best, his style
partook of that spare, bleak, motivically stingy counterpoint that
nobody south of the Baltic ever seems to write.”


Spare, bleak, motivically stingy counterpoint. You might describe the
music of Webern or Schoenberg the same way, without meaning to praise
either one of them. But for Gould, stinginess could be an artistic
virtue and bleakness could be liberating, just as the North that Gould
idealized was free of buildings, roads and other people. […]

"Our Man for Bach, but Also Schoenberg," Robert Everett-Green, Toronto Globe and Mail, Sept. 22, 2007

B major, suspended

[…]
So, however rude and annoying Obama got in his repeated insistence that
he would not dislodge the earbuds from his senatorial ears, I felt the
strong urge to make him comfortable, happy, and part of the party.
"Tell me what kind of music you like." I said, "Maybe we have a CD
you'd prefer to the one that's playing." Obama obliged, listing six or
eight band names I'd never heard of. If only I could recall some of
them, but all I can say is that 1. they sounded like indie rock bands
and 2. they were totally unknown to me. I felt foiled.

Then I got another idea. "Let me listen to a couple of songs on your iPod, and I'll see if I have some music that I think
you would like, based on what you're listening to." Reluctantly, Obama
obliged, handing his earbuds over to me. At this point a surreal,
only-in-your-dreams moment occurred and I realized that Obama's iPod
was somehow connected to a heavy cable that trailed off into the other
room, which made it awkward to manipulate. I managed to get the earbuds
in and, to my great astonishment, I recognized the song that was
playing. Quite improbably, it was "Race for the Prize," the first track
off the Flaming Lips' CD The Soft Bulletin. I got inordinately
excited, all of the frustration and anxiety that had built up over
Obama's musical intransigence and my inability to please him melting
away in a wash of excitement. "The Flaming Lips! We listen to that
band! We have this CD!" As I disentangled myself from Obama's iPod and rushed off to put The Soft Bulletin on the CD player, my dream melted into some other scene…

"Barack Obama's iPod,"
Oral Hygiene Queen,
May 5, 2007

[…] Barack Obama said his last purchase was "probably" "Ray," the score
from the Oscar-winning movie on the life of R&B crooner Ray Charles. […]

"Prez pols' sound of music,"
Neil Graves,
New York Post,
May 10, 2007
(via stereogum)

At first listen, the Indigo Girls
don't make any sense, not for the hyper-macho world of a presidential
campaign, much less a summertime rally for a superstar like Barack Obama.
But his sound people are piping in the feminist folk duo's music anyway
to pump up a crowd of hundreds at this small-town coffee shop on the
Fourth of July. They play "Hammer and a Nail," a 1990 declaration of
female empowerment and emancipation. "You've got to tend the earth,"
the Girls sing, "if you want a rose."

Then Obama comes out, looking lithe and dashing, with his
6-year-old daughter, Sasha, in his arms. The soundtrack starts to make
sense. "I'm a sucker for girls," says the man who wants to be president.
"There is nothing more difficult than me being on the phone hearing
about their soccer game, hearing about what happened to them in school
and knowing that I am not there in the evenings to share a lot of their
life." He turns to his wife, Michelle, who is sitting nearby on a
stool. "She is smarter," he says. "She is tougher." […]

"Hillary is from Mars, Obama is from Venus,"
Michael Scherer,
Salon.com,
July 12, 2007

[…] "I'm old school, so generally, generally, I'm more of a jazz
guy, a Miles Davis, a John Coltrane guy, more of a Marvin Gaye, Stevie
Wonder kind of guy," Obama said in the interview. "But having said
that, I'm current enough that on my iPod I've got a little bit of
Jay-Z. I've got a little Beyonce." […]
 

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"Barack Obama gets name-dropped in hip-hop,"

Peter Hamby,
CNN,
August 17, 2007
"You've been in a room once in a while with a rock star. He walks into
the world, and he takes your breath away. I'd love him to be president,
quite honestly. […]"

"Clooney: Obama's Like a Rock Star,"
Colleen Barry,
Associated Press (via Washington Post),
Sept. 1, 2007

[…] Rock stars may hide behind all sorts of masks — be it makeup, a
thuggish image or an alter ego named Sasha — but when they perform,
the best of them give the audience the sense that it's witnessing a
very real part of their personality.

There's something charmingly old school about the notion of a rock
star, a larger than life character that at once seems untouchable but
also like an intimate friend. The Internet can't make a rock star — at
least not yet. Sites like YouTube
celebrate accessibility and the notion that everyone should be equally
seen and heard. Rock stars still benefit from the quaint notion that
they are more subversive, more audacious, more fearless, more sensitive
than everyone else. They speak truth to power. They speak for the
disenfranchised. They are poets. It doesn't matter that some of the
biggest stars are akin to private corporations with all the
hierarchies, for-profit motives and mainstream popularity that implies.
The myth of the rock star endures. And at some point, everyone turns into a groupie.


"For Those Who Rock, We Salute You,"

Robin Givhan,
Washington Post,
Sept. 2, 2007

Songs I’m not listening to on the radio

If Everyone Cared