Five for fact-ing

I was tagged by me3dia and mellemusic:

"Once you have been tagged, you have to write a blog with 5 facts about yourself. Then choose 5 people you want to tag and list their names. Then leave a comment on their blog letting them know they’ve been tagged."

"Facts," eh? Right, then, five each for you both, so choose from among the following:

  • I was a National Merit Scholar semifinalist.
  • I lost my virginity two weeks before I turned 21.
  • I've shaken Archbishop Desmond Tutu's hand.
  • I've never wanted to be younger than my given age.
  • I was once the "hit" in a Bay Bridge hit-and-run. (The car radio was tuned to KFOG: Del Amitri in concert, covering Motorhead's "Ace of Spades.")
  • I've played the Tinman in two college productions of "The Wiz."
  • I had Osgood-Schlatter's as a teenager.
  • I've never broken a bone.
  • I was a Boy Scout (but pretty much quit after making Second Class).
  • I'm a junior.

Tagged? David, Mr. cruftbox, Ms. FantasyLibrarian, Judith and Eve.

Incendiary (1)

Incendiary
Chris Cleave

I figured I'd follow
Michelle's lead on jotting down mini-reviews of books she read last year. She's already two in so far this year and working on her third most likely, and so am I.

I think the last time I spent so much time "in" book-London was Zadie
Smith's "White Teeth." That may change once I check out Ian McEwan's
"Saturday" or Steven Johnson's "The Ghost Map."

Seeing "Children of Men" twice while reading the book affected how I
followed along with a fictional UK government's response to and
relationship with terror.

Books about cities, as much as about people, done right, send readers off with more questions than answers, and I'm not talking about hunting for travel agents or guidebooks. Said volumes pull you in before capturing the look on your face as they levitate in the air before you, asking you to consider the basis for support, plausibility's invisible strings connecting you to the finished plot on the page. That's what Chris Cleave's done here. (Start as you mean to go on with the extract.)

King’s other dream

"[…] There is at the outset a very obvious and
almost facile connection between the war in Vietnam and the struggle I
and others have been waging in America. A few years ago there was a
shining moment in that struggle. It seemed as if there was a real
promise of hope for the poor, both black and white, through the poverty
program. There were experiments, hopes, new beginnings. Then came the
buildup in Vietnam, and I watched this program broken and eviscerated
as if it were some idle political plaything of a society gone mad on
war. And I knew that America would never invest the necessary funds or
energies in rehabilitation of its poor so long as adventures like
Vietnam continued to draw men and skills and money like some demonic,
destructive suction tube. So I was increasingly compelled to see the
war as an enemy of the poor and to attack it as such. […]"

"Beyond Vietnam: A Time to Break Silence" (background)

King’s other dream

"[…] There is at the outset a very obvious and
almost facile connection between the war in Vietnam and the struggle I
and others have been waging in America. A few years ago there was a
shining moment in that struggle. It seemed as if there was a real
promise of hope for the poor, both black and white, through the poverty
program. There were experiments, hopes, new beginnings. Then came the
buildup in Vietnam, and I watched this program broken and eviscerated
as if it were some idle political plaything of a society gone mad on
war. And I knew that America would never invest the necessary funds or
energies in rehabilitation of its poor so long as adventures like
Vietnam continued to draw men and skills and money like some demonic,
destructive suction tube. So I was increasingly compelled to see the
war as an enemy of the poor and to attack it as such. […]"

"Beyond Vietnam: A Time to Break Silence" (background)

Best of ’06

In no order mostly because I am lazy:

TRACKS (FIRST TIER: PLAYED A LOT, LIKED A LOT)

Gnarls Barkley, "Crazy"
Christina Aguilera, "Ain’t No Other Man"
Girl Talk, "Bounce That"
Cassandra Wilson, "Go to Mexico"
Corinne Bailey Rae, "Put Your Records On"
Donald Fagen, "H Gang"
Justin Timberlake, "LoveStoned/I Think That She Knows"
Pete Kuzma [feat. Bilal], "High and Dry"
Amy Millan, "Skinny Boy"
Jenny Lewis With The Watson Twins, "Big Guns"
Scritti Politti, "The Boom Boom Bap"
Dert [feat Jose Gonzalez, Kanye West, Talib Kweli & Common], "Get 'Em High/Lovestain"
Herbert, "Something Isn't Right"
Amel Larrieux, "Gills and Tails"
TV On the Radio, "Wolf Like Me"
Jamie Lidell, "Multiply (In a Minor Key)"

TRACKS (SECOND TIER: PLAYED LESS, STILL LIKED)

Ani DiFranco, "Millennium Theater"
Killer Mike, "That's Life"
Honeycut, "Butter Room"
The Pipettes, "Pull Shapes"
The Radio Department, "I Don't Like It LIke This"
Camera Obscura, "Let's Get Out Of This Country"
Lily Allen, "LDN"
Cat Power, "The Greatest"
Phoenix, "Long Distance Call"
E-40 feat. Keak the Sneak, "Tell Me When To Go"
Mocky feat. Feist, "Fighting Away the Tears"
Tom Waits, "The Road to Peace"
Killer Mike, "That's Life"
Lady Sovereign, "Love Me or Hate Me"
Dixie Chicks, "Not Ready to Make Nice"
Morrissey, "You Have Killed Me"
Prince, "Black Sweat"
The Rapture, "Get Myself Into It"
Nelly Furtado [ft. Timbaland], "Promiscuous"
Beck, "Think I'm In Love"
Peter, Bjorn and John, "Young Folks"
The Walkmen, "Louisiana"
Jay-Z, "Show Me What You Got"
Gnarls Barkley, "Smiley Faces"
The Rapture, "Whoo! Alright! Yeah … Uh Huh"
Final Fantasy, "This Lamb Sells Condos"

ALBUMS

Herbert, "Scale"
Gnarls Barkley, "St. Elsewhere"
Thom Yorke, "The Eraser"
Neko Case, "Fox Confessor Brings the Flood"
Donald Fagen, "Morph the Cat"
Scritti Politti, "White Bread, Black Beer"
Jenny Lewis With the Watson Twins, "Rabbit Fur Coat"
k-os, "Atlantis: Hymns for Disco"
T-Bone Burnett, "The True False Identity"
Cassandra Wilson, "Thunderbird"
TV On the Radio, "Return to Cookie Mountain"
Cat Power, "The Greatest”
Justin Timberlake, "FutureSex/LoveSounds"

MOVIES

"Miami Vice"
"Casino Royale"
"The Queen"
"Shortbus"
"An Inconvenient Truth"
"Heading South"
"Akeelah and the Bee"
"The Departed"
"Children of Men"
"Babel"

Popozuda and circumstance

“The reasons are purely aesthetic, not medical, especially for women. They want to get thin no matter what, all
because of images from north of the Equator. It is a cruel cultural
imposition on the Brazilian woman.”


Dr. Elisaldo de
Araújo Carlini, "a professor at the Federal University of São Paulo
."

“To be fat used to be considered wonderful in Brazil, because it
showed that you eat very well, which is important to Brazilians. That you have three meals a day and eat
meat and beans, calmly, at a table with friends and relatives, means
that someone is taking good care of you.”

Roberto da Matta, "an anthropologist and newspaper columnist who is a leading social commentator."


“Those huge breasts you see in the United States, like in Playboy, were
always considered ridiculous in Brazil. But there is now more of a
tendency than before to want breasts that are a bit larger — not to
make them huge, mind you, but more proportional as part of a body that
is more svelte and more athletic.”

<

p style=”text-align: right”>Ivo Pitanguy, "the
country’s most renowned plastic surgeon."

“This abrupt shift is a feminine
decision that reflects changing roles […] Men are still resisting and clearly
prefer the rounder, fleshier type. But women want to be free and
powerful, and one way to reject submission is to adopt these
international standards that have nothing to do with Brazilian society.”

Mary del Priore, "a historian and co-author of 'The History of Private Life in Brazil'"

Larry Rohter, New York Times, "In the Land of Bold Beauty, a Trusted Mirror Cracks"